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Posts Tagged ‘skills’

(When) should I start looking elsewhere?

Monday, September 6th, 2010

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In honor of Labor Day, I help examine a question that millions of workers ask themselves on a regular basis.

In addition to the time I’ve personally spent on both sides of the interview desk, over the years I’ve heard numerous stories from clients I’ve either counseled for months during their job search, or just chatted with while designing their resumes.  Certainly, many people are currently out of work and looking for whatever employment they can find right now.  It does help to do a targeted search, though.  Making the best use of your time can improve your odds significantly.

For many people, making the decision to start looking for another job is the most difficult step of all in the entire process.

Is it the right time?  Is there anything better, anyway?  At least what I have is a known quantity, right?  How do I face all of that rejection, interview after interview, before I get an offer? What are my strengths and weaknesses?  I don’t even know where I see myself NEXT year, let alone in five years . . .  Maybe I’d better wait and see if it gets better . . .

Here are some guidelines I give to people, as a sort of mental checklist, to see if staying or looking might be a better move at this time.  Each person has to decide for her/himself, of course:
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What priorities do you have with employment?

Location?  Salary?  Title/Authority?  Benefits?  Training?  (Consider your reaction, for example, if your salary increased by 20% but your commute time doubled.  Would that matter?)  Make a specific list of the top five aspects of a job that you seek.  What are you receiving and what are you lacking?
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Don’t wait until you’re miserable at your current place of employment

ALL job searches take months to complete.  Not only will it make the process seem longer, but it might actually be longer!  Presenting a positive outlook is important when interviewing, and you are less likely to do this if depressed.  In addition, you may be more desperate to leave, so that you end up taking something you typically wouldn’t and are no better off.
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Think ahead about your career and act instead of react

Escaping a bad situation is one reason to leave a position, but that is reactive.  What do you want as the next step in your career?  Can you get that where you currently are?  If yes, list the steps you need to take and begin on #1.  If no, then it probably is time to start looking elsewhere.
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Realize that everything you do and don’t do is setting the stage – or blocking your path – for your next position, promotion, assignment, etc.

This has to do with more than your wardrobe, although that is certainly an element.  Are you punctual – and work more than required hours when that’s what it takes to get the job done?  How good are your writing, spelling, grammar and computer skills?  Do you contribute ideas or wait to be asked?

How many people outside your immediate department know who you are and what you do?  If someone (not necessarily your director) were asked for input on an important project, would they respond, “[Your name] would be great for that!”?  How can you make that a reality?  Many jobs are hired through word of mouth and networking instead of from responses to listings; therefore, you need to be known for your expertise through various channels.
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Invest in yourself

It’s best if your employer has a training budget and pays for you to attend various courses and seminars, but if not, attend these on your own.  (This should also be an indicator to you about whether or not you want to stay with this employer: How much can you grow and learn here?  Will they even care or reward you if you do?)

Many online trainings are available, and you can see a variety of free and low cost courses listed on the Bilou Calendar, depending on what you’re looking for.  Membership in professional societies also provides valuable face-to-face networking opportunities.  How many online publications do you read to stay informed about what is current in your field?  Finally, in this competitive job market, having your resume professionally designed and/or a career counselor can help give you an advantage over other job seekers.

Whatever your final conclusion is, most people feel more assured if they run through a checklist similar to the one above and actually do an assessment, instead of constantly wondering, “What if . . . ?”  Only you can decide to Fix It Or Forget It! in the end.

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Good judgment comes from experience, and experience comes from bad judgment.
—  Rita Mae Brown

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