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Posts Tagged ‘Vimeo’

Accentuate the Positive, Eliminate the Negative

Wednesday, December 5th, 2012

As you assess which portions of your campaign have been more successful than the others, no doubt you are considering which parts to eliminate or start anew.  It can be tempting to see what the trends are and mimic them.

It’s more important, though, to discern which parts of your campaigns your constituents are most responsive to, and keep those going strong, while adding and/or improving on others.

For example, you may be considering adding Pinterest this coming year, which might be a good fit with your demographic, but first consider carefully if you’re responding to media hype or what your constituents really prefer.  A recent study shows that people would prefer more videos than many other social media channels.

Social Media Sites Used

If you do add videos, make certain they are valuable ones that get searched and viewed . . . otherwise, you’ve spent a great deal of time in production for nothing.

Another social media change you might consider is adding GooglePlus, due to Facebook’s altered analytics and essential demand that you purchase ads, if you want your content to be viewed.  This doesn’t show signs of going away in 2013, since “stock prices” of FB keep making the news.  (Nearly all nonprofits – large and small – have seen a vast drop in their Facebook viewership, likes and shares this year.)

Direct mail is still a crucial part of your overall campaign, but it’s imperative to treat it as a multichannel appeal, which has a better overall response rate:

•     Do you include a direct hyperlink in mailings?
•     Do you include your social media channel logos prominently?

When sending email appeals, do you test your emails on various screens before sending – particularly mobile?  What about the links within the email . . . particularly your online giving form(s)?  How many clicks, scrolling and/or pop-ups is the mobile user subjected to?

It is going to be necessary to enhance and upgrade your mobile features, accessibilities for the coming year – and beyond.  There’s no doubt.  More and more users are accessing the web via mobile.  This figure is only going to increase.

You’ve got five seconds, BTW.  Has it loaded yet?  Oops.  I’ve moved on.  Try again, please.  (Think of the donors you might have gotten if you’d have tested this first.)

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Keep the base of the pyramid strong

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Video Is Becoming More Important Than Ever Before!

Wednesday, July 18th, 2012

I recently attended a presentation by Chip Dizárd, on the importance of video – good video – to the overall nonprofit campaign.  Chip teaches video techniques to Baltimore City school students, often working with nonprofits.

Not only are videos being shared in greater numbers than ever before

but the types of videos that are among those being viewed most directly relate to nonprofit fundraising:

According to Pew Research, nearly ¾ of online adults are using video sharing sites, and more than 1/3 are now looking for their news in the form of online videos.  Will your organization be there to provide any of the information that people are seeking in this medium . . . or will your competition supply it instead?

These days, it’s not enough simply to have a phone and shoot an amateur video, Chip explained.  It’s essential to have a plan, for one thing.  What are you intending to shoot?  What story are you telling?  What do you hope that viewers will do once they are finished viewing your video?  Donate? Volunteer? Sign a petition?  Understand your organization better?  If you don’t know, it’s not time to hit the [RECORD] button yet.

Consider your audience and the story they want and need to hear about your organization and what you’ve been accomplishing.  You’ll do much better telling a story about – and from! – the people you’re serving, rather than the executive director making a speech for ten minutes.  (“That’s what my donations pay for?!”)

It’s also crucial to consider the quality of the video itself, Chip explained.  The competition for viewing eyes is much greater, so if you post something with poor lighting, sound, etc., you can forget having others share it.  Your wonderful script and passionate speaker will have been for naught.

Of course, nonprofits can’t afford the best equipment in the industry, but a good executive director understands that prioritizing enough to invest in some good enough equipment to get the job done is essential.  A decision will have to be made about how important quality online representation is to the organization.

Some very high quality video production can be farmed out, but quite a bit can be done in-house with relatively little investment initially.

Also, there are many intern programs, such as Chip’s, where students who are learning in the classroom are willing to apply it in the organization and company offices.  Chip suggests searching on Twitter, for example, and laments, “People aren’t using social media to its full advantage,” when it comes to networking and finding one another.

An additional important component that nonprofits should add to their video campaign goals is applying for a YouTube Nonprofit account, which allows for additional features, including a clickable link directly within the video.  This can take the viewer outside of YouTube, to a donation page, a petition, or other actionable web page related to your campaign.

How do you plan to bolster video for your campaign in the coming year?

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Keep the base of the pyramid strong

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(How) Are You Using Video in Your Campaign?

Wednesday, December 7th, 2011

The nonprofit without video in its campaign is leaving money on the table.  It’s a compelling part of storytelling, and has increased dramatically as a social media channel.  More smartphone market share will only bolster these figures.

Like other social media channels, video works best when it is incorporated with existing campaigns, in addition to occasionally – and eventually – standing alone.  Particularly if you are entering this arena for the first time, you’ll need vehicles to drive your audience to your new venue, so inserting links into your direct mail pieces and emails is a good place to start.  Don’t forget to use QR codes as well, since they can also represent a hyperlink.

Videos don’t always need to be professionally produced, either.  It really depends upon the purpose of the message.  Many nonprofits simply purchase a flip camera and begin shooting.  There may be times when a more polished image is necessary, however.  This is not different than printing many mail pieces in house and investing occasionally in a fine piece with a professional printer for a special mailing.

An important thing to remember is that it’s better to keep your message(s) short and to the point, however.  I advised a client in the past who had just begun to delve into the world of video, after presenting me with their first production that it needed to be chopped into several different pieces.  It was over ten minutes long, which I informed them that nobody would watch!

The great thing about it, though, was that it could easily be segmented into usable smaller portions.  What they had done was have an intro, where the director said “hello,” and spoke about the organization and its mission.  Next, they showed footage of a client they’d helped, with “before” and “after” footage, which took about three minutes.  After that, they showed another client’s “before” and “after,” and another client . . . and another . . .

Putting the right tags on each of these videos as separate items, I explained, would allow viewers who were interested to have the videos come up in the menu sidebar as “more videos like this,” and those viewers could continue watching, but it wouldn’t be a turn off as being too long and prevent nearly everyone from learning about their organization and its services.

There are a variety of messages that nonprofits can convey to their constituents through video, just as they can with direct mail and email:

•  Tell a heartfelt story about the people that the organization is trying to help

•  Have a spokesperson succinctly summarize the mission and add a call to action

•  Have a narrator summarize the mission and add a call to action

•  Provide a progress report (“Here’s what your donation is accomplishing!”)

•  Keep in touch with constituents, send a warm greeting

Additional ways to incorporate videos within existing channels would include adding a YouTube, Vimeo and/or Flickr tab to your Facebook page, and capturing still frames as photos to place in mailings or emailings as needed.

Finally, apply for a YouTube for Nonprofits account, which will allow you to insert clickable links within the videos you produce.  This important addition makes it easier for your viewers to take direct action straight from the video they are currently viewing.

How are you planning to make use of video in the coming year?

____________________________________________________________________________
Keep the base of the pyramid strong

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So Much Time and So Little To Do!

How Has Event Management Changed For You?

Get to the Point!

So Much Time And So Little To Do!

Wednesday, March 2nd, 2011

…Strike That – Reverse It!” Words made immortal by Willy Wonka (the real one), which come to mind often for those in Annual Giving, who have more and more added to our plate every day, it seems. What does a complete campaign look like, anyway?

Everyone knows that If you keep doing what you’ve been doing, you’ll keep getting what you’ve been getting – and who wants that? No, we must keep our current donors, of course, but add some sizzle and pop to the mix as well . . . only what does that mean, exactly?

Direct Mail
Ok, even though it’s an old standby, people are still responding to mail. It’s most likely a hefty portion of your budgetary income, so A/B testing is good. It’s also important to have a good tagline and place a meaningful hyperlink with all mail appeals, since integrated campaigns perform better overall.

Special Events
Even events aren’t the same any longer. Few invitations are simply sent via mail with confirmations or RSVPs over the phone. Now, in addition to email, events are posted on Facebook pages, Evite, Twitter, etc. In fact, some organizations are getting creative and tweeting their events as they are happening – and not just the people with smart phones! What other spin can make your event(s) fresh, new and exciting? Where’s the video camera?

Video
Storytelling with video is more important than ever now. A compelling narrative with video is a medium like no other, and your organization needs to keep up by joining in. Michael Hoffman points out, however, that another crucial element is the YouTube Nonprofit program, so that clickable links can be added at the end of a message. Have you gotten your account yet, so that you can embed these links in your YouTube videos? Also, what about Vimeo, Funny or Die and other channels? YouTube isn’t the only video space on the web – where are your constituents?

Email Marketing & Online Giving
Like direct mail, email has become an essential tool that isn’t dead, but needs revamping to keep up. Have you added photos and links to videos, as well as your Facebook page, Twitter, LinkedIn, YouTube, etc. channels, so that email recipients can connect with you as they wish? Are these buttons also visible on your website template, too, so that regardless of one’s browsing, a constituent can easily find your social media channels? What about a [share] button? Do you monitor your click through rates on your email campaigns?

Analytics
There are many more analytics online to monitor than just who opens your emails and acts on them. Have you been monitoring your search terms, so that your site design offers what people most frequently want? Do you have a Google Analytics account, so that you know the details of your site traffic, once people land, how many pages they visit, how often they stay, etc.? And what about your offline stats? How much analysis do you do regarding direct mail (acquisition, renewal, lapsed, etc.), events, and so forth?

Phonathon
The nature of phonathon has changed, but many nonprofits are still making money by conducting them on a regular basis, and adapting them to their specific circumstances. Others are finding them to be more and more obsolete, however, as their donor base is abandoning land lines in greater numbers and are seeking a better way to connect with these high tech potential supporters.

Mobile
There is no question that connecting with constituents via mobile is the wave of the future – not only for solicitation, but for text messaging and many other uses. Projections predict that the first decade of mobile giving fundraising will surpass that of online giving. Mobile can also facilitate sending tweets or other short messages that notify members of recent legislation, ask for event RSVPs, or simply send people to a specific page of importance on your website. Some predictions see smart phones replacing wallets in the next several years, so communication via mobile will be an essential part of your organization’s strategy. Oh, and then there are QR codes. A whole other world of new and fun applications. Just imagine what you could do with them at an event!

Podcasts
Perhaps you’ve listened to or created podcasts for your organization. Now you can create them on the go, using a smart phone, and integrate them with social media, so that they appear with a photo and on your Twitter and/or Facebook feed. How can you apply short, medium or longer podcasts to your campaign so they are of interest to your constituents?

Facebook
We all know Facebook is a must in the social media realm. If only they wouldn’t keep changing their rules and policies every month or two . . . not to mention the very design of the page itself. (Am I logged in as myself or the administrator??) Analytics can help here, too, to know what, when and how to post to Facebook.

Twitter
Perhaps you haven’t yet delved into the micro-blogging world of Twitter. Well, jump in and learn all about hashtags, following and retweeting! Don’t fool yourself into thinking that only one demographic is participating, or that your people aren’t there – they are! Details on how to do it well are useful, of course, but everyone is on a learning curve at first. You’ll learn best by doing it.

Blogging
Studies have shown that one of the best ways to drive traffic to your website is by blogging – providing useful, relevant content to your followers on a regular basis. One of the biggest mistakes that most new bloggers make, however, is not following through with a schedule once they get started blogging. Whether you’re going to blog weekly, monthly or bi-monthly, announce it and stick to it, so that you will build a loyal readership that knows they can count on viewing your content on a regular basis. (Of course, Seth Godin recommends blogging on a daily basis. Why argue with him?)

There are several other items on your to do list, of course: LinkedIn, Delicious, Foursquare, recruiting and training your board members to be better solicitors – not to mention your own training. (You do have your CFRE, don’t you?) In your spare time, you’ll need to meet several donors face to face and get out a few grant proposals, too.

By the way, will I see you at NTEN or AFP this month? No? Why not?

Well, there are online training events . . .

____________________________________________________________________________
Keep the base of the pyramid strong

What Are You Learning?

Monday, September 27th, 2010

People never stop learning.  In one form or another, we all continue to discover, absorb and conclude, whether we do it in a classroom or not.  Ideally, organizations realize the need for employees to continue keeping up with current trends and they budget for this.  Unfortunately, this isn’t typical, so what’s one to do?

Of course, everyone should grow and learn new things on the job, but some jobs require a steeper learning curve than others, because the evolution of their field is moving more rapidly than others.  Annual Giving is one such sector, since technology affects this part of fund raising more than, say, Planned Giving.  Certainly new laws on estate planning are important for professionals to know, but it’s doubtful that they are changing as quickly as the landscape of social media, for example. Often one feels that if you blink, you might miss something.

A recent study by Guidestar on the economy’s effect showed that five of the top six ways that nonprofits used to reduce costs were related to staffing, salary and benefits, which surely translates to less funds for training as well.

Couple this with the fact that when training budgets are doled out, Annual Giving professionals typically receive the smallest allowance, and you have a double whammy of those in need of the most training having the least means to receive it.  Seth Godin makes a good argument about how the old business model of worker and employer is disintegrating, and stresses the importance of a worker being “fast, smart and flexible” in our new, emerging economy.

Here are but a few examples of items that Annual Giving professionals will need to add to their toolbox:

•     Facebook has a reputation for changing its features on a regular basis.  Facebook Places is one of the newer features to learn.
•     Twitter is rolling out several major changes, including the ability to view photos, video and past tweets without scrolling.
•     Video – It’s going to be more than just creating something on YouTube or Vimeo and inserting it into an email or posting it onto your Facebook page.  Soon, every individual, company and organization will be able to have its own web-based “tv” channel.
•     RSS (Real Simple Syndication) or text messaging – see some examples of how it can (and is) being used, including a non profit example.  How can you use RSS to keep in touch with your constituents?
•     SlideShare  –  Beth Kanter has great suggestions.  Although I clearly don’t utilize it enough, you can see results of various polls I’ve taken on social media habits from audiences over the years.
•     LinkedIn is changing the specs on its site, upgrading the social networking and other features a great deal lately.  What will that mean for how you market yourself online?
•     Technology requirements to handle all of your applications and other needs.  The Seattle Public Library launched a matching gift campaign, and their site crashed soon after the campaign began, in response to the outpouring of the unanticipated support.

Patrick* made a point to sign up for as many classes as his organization – and professional society – offered during his first year on the job, in order to learn as much as he could.  He wanted to be well versed, and take full advantage of what the company (and his membership) had to offer.

At the end of his first year, he had raised a great deal more money than his predecessor and also implemented some successful new events, etc.  He arrived at his performance review with a list of his accomplishments and a calendar of the trainings that helped him learn how to achieve said tasks, as well as a proposed schedule of upcoming courses.

He was stunned at his manager’s reaction:  Instead of praising him for having a good plan and learning so much, he chastised Patrick for having taken so many courses:  “I had no idea you were spending this much time out of the office!”  His manager denied Patrick’s proposed training schedule for the new year, and said he would have to cut it by half.

“When I asked ‘Why?’ since I had clearly raised more funds,” Patrick recounted, all I could get was, “‘It doesn’t look good for you to be gone that much.‘”

Patrick made a point in the future only to highlight the end result (his accomplishments) and not the means of achieving them (his training) during performance reviews.

Ramona* also met with difficulty over getting training.  She knew that budgets were tight, so she rarely asked to go to seminars, but there was one that she felt was very valuable and was not terribly expensive, so she asked to attend.

When she approached her director, he only pretended to review the materials and listen to her argument, but turned her down almost immediately.  Ramona decided not to give up just yet, and searched the seminar website for scholarships, since she couldn’t afford the entire cost herself.  Finally, she contacted the conference organizer when she found no scholarship application online, and explained the situation.  She was successful in getting a free admission to the two day conference!

Ramona made a point to network with others in her professional society – locally and nationally – and had a friend in the nearby city, within a day’s driving distance.  She arranged to stay with her friend, rather than pay for a hotel.

Because her manager hadn’t bothered to notice the details of the conference during her initial request, Ramona simply put the dates down as a vacation request, stating that she was “visiting a friend,” and said nothing more about it.  She returned with more skills – and contacts – to put in her professional toolbox.  She knew enough about her manager’s dynamics to realize that he wouldn’t reward or praise her for her resourcefulness, but most likely subtract future opportunities from her if he knew she had received this training.

While neither Patrick’s nor Ramona’s situations are ideal, they each found ways to continue developing their skills professionally, working around the limitations set before them.  Although it’s important to invest in yourself when necessary, it’s also essential to know when to draw the line and realize if you’re simply not being supported – and never will be.

What then, are some tangible, low-cost actions that Annual Giving professionals can take, to sharpen their skills and become more knowledgeable about this profession that seems to be moving at the speed of light?

•     Network within the professionJoining a professional society such as AFP, AHP, APRA, CASE, NTEN, etc. is advisable.  Connecting with others who are dealing with similar issues can be invaluable.
•     Invest in a mentor relationship – Ask someone you admire to coach you in an area you’d like to learn more about, but also offer your skills to another who is eager to learn.
•     Research scholarships – Many organizations offer scholarships for membership and/or conference attendance.  Investigate and use these applications sparingly, since they’re often only valid once.
•     Take online courses – A great deal of training is available online, and because there is no space to rent or perhaps a limit on attendance, the cost is often very low or even free.  The Bilou Calendar lists many courses related to Annual Giving, and you can subscribe to it.

In the end, you have to drive your career and determine its direction.  You’re learning new things constantly, regardless.  The question is, what do you most want to learn?

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Good judgment comes from experience, and experience comes from bad judgment.
—  Rita Mae Brown

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